Category: Bankruptcy

Norwich Diocese bankruptcy Horowitz Law

Norwich Diocese Abruptly Ends “Independent” Sex Abuse Audit

The Investigation, Which Began in Late 2019, Is Suddenly Called Off Mere Days after Norwich Diocese Files For Bankruptcy

On July 31, 2021, the Diocese of Norwich announced that it had abruptly ended a nearly two-year long “independent” audit and investigation into the Diocese’s handling of sexual abuse allegations since its formation in 1953.  Bishop Michael Cote previously told media and parishioners that he ordered the investigation as a means of healing the deep wounds of clergy sexual abuse in the Diocese, and of learning the lessons that could prevent it from happening again.

When we at Horowitz Law first heard about the Diocese of Norwich’s investigation, we hoped for the best.     Bishop Cote said all of the right things, using words like “accountability” and “transparency.”  We hoped the Norwich Diocese realized it was time to end its strategy of death by a thousand paper cuts, and to lay itself bare and accept its penance for what had happened to so many innocent children entrusted to the care of its clergy.  Our firm has already identified 58 priests and clergy who have been accused of sexually abusing kids in the Norwich Diocese, more than even the Diocese of Norwich itself has disclosed.

But we knew better.  After all, the timing of Bishop Cote’s announcement was random, to say the least, coming more than a year after the investigation apparently began, and at a time when the news was sandwiched between presidential election coverage and COVID headlines. Thanks to COVID, no one was allowed to attend mass in person to hear his letter being read.  It all seemed too strategic, as if the Bishop hoped no one would notice his announcement and public pledges to truth… as if he knew it was nothing more than an empty promise in a year that had been full of so many other losses and disappointments.

The Bishop’s promise said a team of independent investigators, led by a respected former judge, were conducting a “comprehensive analysis and review of claims of clerical sexual abuse of minors, the Diocese’s knowledge of such abuse and its response to allegations and information presented to it concerning the alleged clergy abuse.” He also said investigators had been given “complete and unrestricted access to all Diocesan files, records, and archives dating from the establishment of the Diocese in 1953 to the present along with the opportunity to interview Diocesan clergy and administrators with information relevant to the investigation.”

Cote was applauded by some for his commitment to transparency and openness.  He promised the results of the investigation would be presented in a public report addressing the sexual abuse of minors by diocesan clergy as well as the response of Church leadership to that abuse.  It would name abusers who had not yet been named publicly. It would catalog the Diocese’s reactions and coverups “back then,” a phrase often uttered by bishops across the United States as if the passage of time should excuse what they did.

Then, after the November 2020 announcement, the cracks began to show.  They usually do.  The investigators made no commitments to speaking with abuse victims who had previously reported their abuse.  “It depends,” they said, on how many calls they received on a new hotline where victims could call and rip open their wounds to report their abuse again. Even then, the investigators might still decide not to talk to any of them.

Almost nine months to the day after Bishop Cote and the Diocese of Norwich announced the investigation and made public promises of transparency, and well before any reports or findings have ever been made public, Bishop Cote said ‘no more.’  The investigation is all over as randomly as it came to be known.  No more transparency, no more truth, no more healing.  The secrets will remain secret.

The priority for the Diocese now?  Protecting its assets.  On July 15, 2021, the Diocese of Norwich quietly filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, citing the number of sex abuse claims filed against it.  Unlike in a traditional lawsuit filed by a survivor of sexual abuse against the Diocese, the Diocese’s priest personnel files will not likely be turned over to anyone for review.  Unlike in many states, the Connecticut Attorney General has no authority to conduct an investigation into any of the state’s three Catholic Dioceses.  The files where the abuse reports are kept will probably never be seen by anyone outside of the Diocese’s inner sanctum now.  They will remain buried in the Diocese’s archives and away from the eyes of the general public.  After the bankruptcy filing deadline, no one can ever sue the Diocese for past abuse ever again. No one will ever know what they did. That’s what they want.  To keep their money and their secrets.

But we all know what they did.  So now we lawyers get our metaphorical shovels and start digging for those secrets as best as we can.  Our clients deserve that, even if the Diocese doesn’t think so.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Norwich in Connecticut.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Connecticut, contact our office today. In July 2021, the Camden Diocese filed for federal bankruptcy protection.  The Court will resolve all claims of sexual abuse in this process but strict filing deadlines will apply and no late claims will be considered, so contact us today.  Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of clergy sexual abuse in Connecticut and nationwide. We can help.

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Norwich Diocese bankruptcy Horowitz Law

Norwich (CT) Diocese is latest to seek Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection

On Thursday, July 15, 2021, the Diocese of Norwich filed for Chapter 11 federal bankruptcy protection, becoming the latest in a slew of Catholic dioceses to do so.  Citing the number of lawsuits that have been filed against it in recent years, along with ongoing discussion about another change in the statute of limitations that would allow more sex abuse survivors to file suit, Bishop Michael Cote says he was left with no other choice.

There are more than 60 lawsuits now pending against the Diocese, according to media reports.  The majority of the ongoing sexual abuse allegations were filed by people who say they were sexually abused at Academy Mount St. John by Brother Paul McGlade and music teacher Brother Pascal Alford.  Two other staff members are named in at least one other suit. The suits claim individuals were between 10-15 years old when victimized between 1986 and 2000 while they attended the academy, which then served as a residential boarding school.

It is a common misconception that a Chapter 11 filing means an entity, like the Diocese of Norwich, has run out of money, leaving sexual abuse claimants without any recourse.  But that is not true.  The claim is simply decided in an alternative process run by the federal bankruptcy court, rather than by a jury trial in a state court, and the insurance carriers who typically pay sexual abuse claims on behalf the diocese will be much more involved.  The amounts paid to survivors in a bankruptcy filing are often much less than in a traditional court case, however.

The Norwich Diocese bankruptcy filing, which comes more than two years after the first Academy Mount St. John lawsuit was filed, is not without its critics, and rightfully so.  Horowitz Law represents survivors of sexual abuse by clergy of the Diocese of Norwich.  Attorney Adam Horowitz said, “Bankruptcy is the latest ploy by the Catholic Church to reduce its legal exposure for covering up clergy sexual abuse nationwide. They evade responsibility and the bankruptcy lawyers get money the survivors of sexual abuse should be getting.  They were the ones who were hurt.  Plus, in a bankruptcy proceeding, the Church can also conceal evidence of its neglect in the handling of sexually abusive priests because the turnover of the diocese’s internal personnel files is not as important as it is in a regular lawsuit.”

Another advantage to the Diocese is the right to be free of additional sexual abuse litigation indefinitely once the case closes.  Once a claims filing deadline has been set by the court, that will be the very last chance most survivors of clergy sexual abuse and exploitation will ever have to get some measure of accountability for what happened to them.  After that date passes, the Diocese will not be subject to liability for any additional claims that arose before the bankruptcy filing, even if other laws would otherwise a lawsuit to be filed, like a change in the statute of limitations.  So it is critically important that you not delay in contacting us today.

Horowitz Law has filed numerous sexual misconduct claims on behalf of children who were sexually abused by clergy of all religious denominations, including Chapter 11 bankruptcy claims.  If you or someone you know was sexually abused by a clergy member or employee of the Diocese of Norwich, please contact our law firm at (888) 283-9922 or send an e-mail to sexual abuse lawyer Adam Horowitz at adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com for a free consultation.

Diocese of Rockville Centre Horowitz Law

Sex Abuse Claims Filing Deadline Set in Rockville Centre Diocese Bankruptcy

On Wednesday, February 24, 2021, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court set the deadline for filing all sexual abuse claims against Rockville Center’s Diocese for August 14, 2021. The Diocese filed for Chapter 11 protection earlier this year to resolve all pending sex abuse claims against the Diocese with the bankruptcy court’s assistance. This bankruptcy impacts the rights of Sexual Abuse Survivors against the Diocese in the case, In re: The Roman Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre, New York.

Contrary to what you might think, a bankruptcy filing does not mean the Diocese is broke: it implies the Diocese is asking for the Bankruptcy Court for help resolving the rest of the sexual abuse claims against it. Its assets will be allocated among all of its creditors, including an unknown number of sexual abuse claimants, known and unknown. It is also a means by which a Catholic Diocese can continue to protect itself and its secrets. For that reason, it is often criticized by survivor advocates and attorneys. The Diocese of Rockville Centre will not likely have to publicize any priest personnel files as part of this process, for example.

The August 14 filing deadline is also referred to as a “bar date” in bankruptcy law. It is a strict, non-negotiable deadline by which all existing claims must be filed against the Diocese of Rockville Centre, or claimants will be forever barred from seeking relief in the future. Regardless of how old the sexual abuse survivor is today or when the abuse occurred, they need to file their claim to receive it by 5 pm on that day. If the victims do not file a timely Sexual Abuse Claim, they may lose rights against the Diocese and Diocese related entities, including any right to compensation. Anyone who was sexually abused on or before October 1, 2020, and believes the Diocese may be responsible for the sexual abuse must file a claim.

For survivors of sexual abuse by anyone employed by the Diocese of Rockville Centre such as a priest, teacher, sacristan, or lay volunteer, this likely means that even if New York lawmakers extend the statute of limitations and otherwise allow you to file a lawsuit, your claim will barred by the bankruptcy bar date. That makes it critically important for anyone who a Rockville Centre Diocese employee victimized to contact competent counsel as soon as possible to discuss your options: the fact is that you probably won’t have any options after August 14, 2021.

The August 14 deadline is a strict filing deadline set by the Court and will not likely be extended by the Court for any reason. Therefore, you should contact us immediately for a free and confidential consultation about your legal options as a survivor of abuse in the Rockville Centre Diocese.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Rockville Centre and throughout New York.  The Diocese of Rockville Centre filed for federal bankruptcy protection in October 2020.  Anyone sexually abused by a priest or employee of the Diocese of Rockville Centre may be entitled to file a claim against the Diocese in these bankruptcy proceedings, but very strict filing deadlines have been set by the Bankruptcy Court.  Most victims of abuse in the Diocese of Rockville Centre will never be able to take against against the Diocese of Rockville Centre if they miss this bankruptcy filing deadline, so it is important that you contact us immediately to discuss your potential case.   Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your legal options today.

NOLA Cathedral Horowitz Law

New Orleans Archdiocese March 1 Filing Deadline Rapidly Approaching

The filing deadline for all sexual abuse claims against the Archdiocese of New Orleans is rapidly approaching. By March 1, 2021, anyone who believes they were the victim of sexual abuse, sexual harassment, or some other type of “sexualized interaction” with a priest, nun, brother, other cleric, employee, or volunteer of the Archdiocese of New Orleans must file a claim with the bankruptcy court or be shut out from justice forever.

Often referred to as a “bar date,” the strict March 1 filing deadline is one of the benefits that the Archdiocese receives from having filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition last year.  The date is referred to as the “bar date” because all claims by creditors – including by people who were victims of childhood sexual abuse – are forever barred after that date.  Even if the Louisiana statute of limitations were ever to change in order to allow previously-expired suits to be filed with the court, anyone with a claim against the Archdiocese of New Orleans will be forbidden from filing a lawsuit because they missed the March 1 bankruptcy bar date.

This is, to put it plainly, your very last chance for accountability if you have been hurt by anyone associated with the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

That is why it is critically important that you contact an attorney to discuss your legal rights and options, even if you are not sure whether you have a case or not.  The definition of potential claimants is very broad in a bankruptcy proceeding so that the largest number of survivors can be helped.  But it is very important that you contact us sooner rather than later so that we have ample time to prepare the best and most complete claim possible for you.

Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection is a tactic we have seen being used all over the country by Roman Catholic dioceses and religious orders to protect itself.  The debtor-diocese receives the protection of the bar date, but also often escapes the public scrutiny of its secrets and coverups becoming public.  The priest personnel files and other relevant documents that a diocese may have to produce during regular litigation are often kept under lock and key by bankruptcy courts, never to be disclosed to the public.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Archdiocese of New Orleans.  The Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for federal bankruptcy protection in April 2020.  Our lawyers are now offering free legal consultations to discuss your legal options as a survivor of sexual abuse by priests and other employees of the New Orleans Archdiocese.  

Very strict filing deadlines have been set by the Bankruptcy Court.  Most victims of abuse will never be able to recover damages if they miss this deadline, so please contact us to discuss your case today.  Call us at (888) 283-9922 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com.

Diocese of Camden Horowitz Law

Sex Abuse Claims Filing Deadline Set in Camden Diocese Bankruptcy

On Friday, February 12, 2021, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court set the deadline for filing all sexual abuse claims against the Diocese of Camden for June 30, 2021. The Diocese filed for Chapter 11 protection earlier this year to resolve all pending sex abuse claims against the Diocese with the bankruptcy court’s assistance. It cited revenue losses because of the millions it paid out to clergy abuse victims and the pandemic. They tried to get the deadline moved up to February but was denied. Camden’s Diocese has nearly 500,000 members across 62 parishes in southern New Jersey’s Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem counties.

Contrary to what you might think, a bankruptcy filing does not mean the Diocese is broke: it means the Diocese is asking for the Bankruptcy Court for help resolving the rest of the sexual abuse claims against it. Its assets will be allocated among all of its creditors, including an unknown number of sexual abuse claimants, known and unknown.

It is also a means by which a Catholic Diocese can continue to protect itself and its secrets. For that reason, it is often criticized by survivor advocates and attorneys. The Diocese of Camden will not likely have to publicize any priest personnel files as part of this process, for example.

The June 30 filing deadline is also referred to as a “bar date” in bankruptcy law. It is a strict, non-negotiable deadline by which all existing claims must be filed against the Diocese of Camden, or claimants will be forever barred from seeking relief in the future.

For survivors of sexual abuse by anyone employed by the Diocese of Camden such as a priest, teacher, sacristan, or lay volunteer, this likely means that even if New Jersey lawmakers extend the statute of limitations and otherwise allow you to file a lawsuit, your claim will barred by the bankruptcy bar date. That makes it critically important for anyone who a Camden Diocese employee victimized to contact competent counsel as soon as possible to discuss your options: the fact is that you probably won’t have any options after June 30, 2021.

While the exact class of persons who can file a claim in the bankruptcy is not yet defined, it is expected that those sexually assaulted by Diocese employees as an adult, as well as the estates of deceased victims, will be able to file claims.

The June 30th deadline is a strict filing deadline set by the Court and will not likely be extended by the Court for any reason.  Therefore, you should contact us immediately for a free and confidential consultation about your legal options as a survivor of abuse in the Camden Diocese.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Camden and throughout New Jersey.  The Diocese of Camden filed for federal bankruptcy protection in October 2020.  Anyone sexually abused by a priest or employee of the Diocese of Camden may be entitled to file a claim against the Diocese in these bankruptcy proceedings, but very strict filing deadlines have been set by the Bankruptcy Court.  Most victims of abuse in the Diocese of Camden will never be able to take against against the Diocese of Camden if they miss this bankruptcy filing deadline, so it is important that you contact us immediately to discuss your potential case.   Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your legal options today.

Fr. Jonathan W. Franklin – Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee

Fr. Jonathan W. Franklin

Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee

Jonathan Franklin Horowitz Law

Ordained: 1956

Death: 1986

Assigned as Follows:

  • Ascension of Our Lord (Donaldsonville, LA)
  • St. Gabriel (New Orleans, LA)
  • 1985: St. Anne (Pensacola, FL)

Summary of Sexual Abuse Allegations against Father Jonathan Franklin:

Father Jonathan Franklin was ordained as a Benedictine order priest in the Diocese of Savannah, Georgia. According to bishopaccountability.com, Fr. Franklin has had multiple allegations of abuse made against him that stretch over three decades while working in New Orleans, Alexandria, Savannah, Atlanta, Pensacola, and Cullman.

According to the Archdiocese of New Orleans’ 2018 clergy report regarding sexual abuse of minors, an allegation against Father Franklin was received in 1959 and referred to abuse that occurred in the late 1950’s. It also notes that Franklin was removed from ministry in the Archdiocese that same year.  He has also been accused specifically of abuse in Louisiana in 1966 that eventually settled in 2005.

In 1975, Franklin moved to St. Bernard Abbey in Cullman, Alabama. A decade later, he was arrested for sexually assaulting a 12-year-old boy in 1985 when he was temporarily assigned to St. Anne’s in Pensacola, Florida.

Fr. Franklin committed suicide in August of 1986, just before his trial for sexually assaulting the 12-year-old boy was about to begin.

John W. Franklin has been included on the Baton Rouge diocese’s list in 2019, Birmingham diocese’s list as of December 14th, 2018, and the Alexandria diocese list on February 6th, 2019 as well.  He is also named on the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee 2020 list of priests that have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of a minor or minors.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee in Florida.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Florida, contact our office today. Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of clergy sexual abuse in Florida and nationwide. We can help. 

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Diocese of Buffalo – Bankruptcy Records

Release of Records in Diocese of Buffalo Bankruptcy  

 

The Diocese of Buffalo filed for Bankruptcy in February of 2020. There’s a question as to whether or not records in the Diocese of Buffalo Bankruptcy case will be released. There are more than 25,000 pages of internal Buffalo Diocese documents relating to clergy abuse, diocesan finances, and personnel files that are being reviewed by lawyers and survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Whether the diocese’s confidential files on clergy abuse will be released to the public is unknown. However, there has been an agreement in terms of the survivors of sexual abuse keeping the files confidential in addition to not pursuing any legal suits against individual parishes and other Catholic entities if they want to see the files for themselves.

In the early 2000s, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles had the largest release of internal church files. There were a ton of victims of sexual abuse that sued under legislation in California that suspended the statute of limitations in child sex abuse cases. However, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles did not declare bankruptcy and it agreed to the disclosures as part of a global settlement with victims.

As for the Diocese of Buffalo, “The diocesan bankruptcy cases in New York could be different, because the Child Victims Act window that suspended the civil statute of limitations in child sex abuse cases continues until Aug. 14, giving abuse survivors some leverage in negotiations with diocese lawyers”, the CEO and legal director of Child USA said.

As of now, the diocese has to produce the files for the creditors’ committee by January 31st, 2021. The files in which the committee has requested in part of their agreement are comprised of the diocese’s finances and files regarding sexual abuse. 

“Ultimately, survivors and victims want to see these documents made public. “That is a primary concern of victims and survivors because the documents represent the truth, and they will help victims trying to heal”, an Attorney said.

On January 15th, 2021, the new leader of the Diocese of Buffalo will be installed and will make the decision of releasing the diocese’s confidential files on clergy abuse.

https://buffalonews.com/news/local/trove-of-buffalo-diocese-abuse-records-turned-over-to-victims-in-bankruptcy-court/article_a43dd8ce-4e9a-11eb-bb44-93864abd9851.html

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Buffalo and throughout New York. The Diocese of Buffalo filed for federal bankruptcy protection in February 2020. Anyone sexually abused by a priest or employee of the Diocese of Buffalo may be entitled to file a claim against the Diocese in these bankruptcy proceedings, but very strict filing deadlines apply. Most victims of abuse in the Diocese of Buffalo will never be able to take action against the Diocese of Buffalo if they miss this bankruptcy filing deadline, so it is important that you contact us immediately to discuss your potential case.   

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your legal options today.

Fr. Luis J. Fernandez – Archdiocese of New Orleans

Father Luis J. Fernandez

Archdiocese of New Orleans

Fr. Luis J. Fernandez Horowitz Law

Ordained:  1971

Retired:  2003

 Assignment History:

  • St. John Vianney Prep in (New Orleans, LA)
  • 1985 St. Christopher the Martyr (Metairie, LA)
  • 1985-1989 Our Lady of Perpetual Help (Kenner, LA)

Summary of Sexual Abuse Allegations against Father Luis J. Fernandez:

In 2007, Fr. Luis J. Fernandez was accused of sexually abusing a minor in the mid-1970s at St. John Vianney Prep in New Orleans, Louisiana along with Fr. Robert Cooper when he was a student there.

According to media reports, Fernandez became close with the boy and his family and received permission to take the 15-year-old boy to a concert and then spend the night at Fernandez’s rectory apartment in 1976.

That night, the victim woke up to see his pants and underwear were pulled down with Fernandez right there.

According to media reports, the Archdiocese of New Orleans offered to pay for the victim’s therapy.

In 1978, Fernandez left New Orleans to be a military chaplain, returning to parish work in 1985.

In 2020, a second accuser came forward with allegations against Fernandez that he abused the victim in the 1980s. Information about the age/gender of his alleged victim, the nature of the alleged sexual abuse, or Fernandez’s assignments at the time of the alleged abuse is unknown.

In 2003, Fernandez retired in Miami, FL where he was last known to be living.

In April of 2020, the Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for bankruptcy protection. As part of its bankruptcy, the Archdiocese of New Orleans will be reviewing and paying claims for anyone sexually abused by diocesan priests and lay employees. This will likely include claims filed on behalf of anyone whose case may be beyond the statute of limitations. 

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Archdiocese of New Orleans. The Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for federal bankruptcy protection in April 2020. Our lawyers are now offering free legal consultations to discuss your legal options as a survivor of sexual abuse by priests and other employees of the New Orleans Archdiocese. Very strict filing deadlines will soon be set by the Bankruptcy Court. Most victims of abuse will never be able to recover damages if they miss this deadline, so please contact us to discuss your case today.

Call us at (888) 283-9922 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com.

Fr. Raymond Hebert – Archdiocese of New Orleans

Father Raymond Hebert

Archdiocese of New Orleans 

Fr. Raymond Hebert Horowitz Law

Ordained:  1952

Retired: 2002

Sued:   2005

Dead:  2014

 Assignment History:

  • 1952-1956  St. Raphael (Lousiana)
  • St. Theresa of the Child Jesus (Lousiana)
  • St. Rose of Lima (Lousiana)
  • Madonna Manor (Marrero, LA)
  • Immaculate Conception Church (Marrero, LA)

Summary of Sexual Abuse Allegations against Father Raymond Hebert:

In 2005, 4 victims sued the Archdiocese of New Orleans claiming Fr. Raymond Hebert sexually abused them as boys at Madonna Manor in Marrero, Louisiana. 

Madonna Manor was part of Hope Haven Center and was a church-run home for troubled youth in before the facilities closed.

Hebert denied the allegations and filed a countersuit for defamation.

By 2010, the cases were dismissed. One plaintiff died, another was emotionally disabled to continue, and the remaining two plaintiffs decided to withdraw their claims. An acknowledgment was made that Hebert did not molest the accusers when they were children at Madonna Manor. Then, Hebert withdrew his countersuit. 

In 2019, there was another suit filed alleging Hebert, 3 nuns, and a lay employee abused a boy at Madonna Manor in Marrero, Louisiana in the 1960s-1970s.

According to media reports, the nuns and the lay employee had been accused in suits by “dozens” of plaintiffs and settled for $5.2M in 2009.

In April of 2020, the Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for bankruptcy protection. As part of its bankruptcy, the Archdiocese of New Orleans will be reviewing and paying claims for anyone sexually abused by diocesan priests and lay employees. This will likely include claims filed on behalf of anyone whose case may be beyond the statute of limitations. 

Hebert died in 2014.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Archdiocese of New Orleans. The Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for federal bankruptcy protection in April 2020. Our lawyers are now offering free legal consultations to discuss your legal options as a survivor of sexual abuse by priests and other employees of the New Orleans Archdiocese. Very strict filing deadlines will soon be set by the Bankruptcy Court. Most victims of abuse will never be able to recover damages if they miss this deadline, so please contact us to discuss your case today.

Call us at (888) 283-9922 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com.

Fr. Luis E. Henoa – Archdiocese of New Orleans

Father Luis E. Henoa

Archdiocese of New Orleans

Ordained:  1974

Place on leave:  2002

Reinstated:  2002 (6 months after leave)

 Assignment History:

  • St. Jerome Church (Kenner, LA)
  • Annunciation Church (New Orleans, LA)
  • Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos (New Orleans, LA)

 Summary of Sexual Abuse Allegations against Father Luis E. Henoa:

Fr. Luis E. Henoa’s name appears publicly on the Archdiocese of New Orleans’ list of clergy credibly accused of sex abuse of minors. 

In 2002, personnel files revealed allegations that Henoa engaged in sex with a minor in 1981. Henoa was placed on administrative leave in May of 2002 after the Archbishop of New Orleans found the allegations against him credible.

Information about the age/gender of alleged victims, the nature of the alleged sexual abuse, or Henoa’s assignments at the time of the alleged abuse is unknown.

In November of 2002, just 6 months after Henoa was placed on leave, he was reinstated to Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos Parish in New Orleans, Louisiana based on the notion that there was not sufficient evidence for Henoa to remain on leave.

Henoa’s current whereabouts are unknown.

In April of 2020, the Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for bankruptcy protection. As part of its bankruptcy, the Archdiocese of New Orleans will be reviewing and paying claims for anyone sexually abused by diocesan priests and lay employees. This will likely include claims filed on behalf of anyone whose case may be beyond the statute of limitations. 

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims of sexual abuse in the Archdiocese of New Orleans. The Archdiocese of New Orleans filed for federal bankruptcy protection in April 2020. Our lawyers are now offering free legal consultations to discuss your legal options as a survivor of sexual abuse by priests and other employees of the New Orleans Archdiocese. Very strict filing deadlines will soon be set by the Bankruptcy Court. Most victims of abuse will never be able to recover damages if they miss this deadline, so please contact us to discuss your case today.

Call us at (888) 283-9922 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com.