Category: Boy Scouts of America

Statute of Limitations for Sexual Abuse Horowitz Law

The Statute of Limitations For Sexual Abuse Reform Movement Marches On!

It’s official. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards has signed House Bill 492, removing the statute of limitations for sexual abuse claims. It’s now the law of the land in Louisiana.

This means that those who were sexually victimized as children in that state – at any time, by anyone, can take an important step to help the wounded heal and help the vulnerable be safer, as they can now file a civil lawsuit. As defendants, they can also name both wrongdoers who perpetrate the abuse AND wrongdoers who enabled it; those who commit AND or concealed these awful crimes.

But that’s only part of the good news regarding archaic, arbitrary, and predator-friendly statute of limitations these days. More and more, our society and courts are expanding victims’ rights to expose predators and win compensation. Read on!

New York City has just enacted a civil window for those sexually abused or assaulted AS ADULTS! Those abused as adults also have expanded opportunities for justice in New Jersey.

Last year, Maine and the North Mariana Islands (a US territory in the western Pacific) became the latest jurisdictions to adopt a permanent revival statute of limitations for child sex crimes. (Vermont did as well in 2019.) Perhaps the first time, federal legislation has been introduced, giving states greater incentive to update and expand their child sex abuse laws. (Specifically, the measure would make states eligible for additional funding if they have ended the statute of limitations in sexual abuse for both civil and criminal cases.)

At the same time, fewer and fewer jurisdictions are upholding or honoring long-standing roadblocks that stand between survivors and justice. Only three states (Utah, Wisconsin, and Missouri) make it harder for abuse survivors to sue because they let churches hide behind the First Amendment (claiming that any abuse lawsuit inevitably interferes with their ‘freedom of religion’). TAKE NOTE: This doesn’t mean you have no hope for justice if you were victimized in these three states. It just means that your legal road is more challenging.

Only eight states still have some form of “charitable immunity,” another obstacle that makes legal action more difficult (though not impossible) for survivors. The Louisiana law merits some explanation. “Over the past year, the Catholic Church has repeatedly argued in Louisiana courts that some of the claims being brought under the lookback window are not valid,” according to one news outlet. Church officials argue that “the window only applies to abuse that has happened since 1993 because the language of the law references an older statute regarding child abuse that wasn’t enacted until 1993.” 

In other words, despite clear legislative intent to help survivors that were shut out of the legal process, the church hierarchy seized on a minor legal technicality to try and evade their duty to help survivors. Several Louisiana judges have ruled in different ways on this argument. That necessitated a second legislative vote that clarified the window. So, in the end, justice prevailed. But only after yet another fight initiated by Catholic bishops.

But now is the time to focus on – and circulate – the good news. Though it’s long overdue, policy-makers across the US are slowly showing greater sensitivity to the suffering and less deference to the powerful, at least in child sex abuse that happens in large institutions. So please spread the word: Though it’s almost always hard for survivors to speak up and seek justice, lawmakers and judges continue to make the journey forward less intimidating and difficult for those who do manage to reach out for help and take action.

We have reached a tipping point in society where sexual assault and abuse victims have become empowered in record numbers to share their stories, speak out, and hold perpetrators and others responsible for acts of sexual misconduct.  We have seen this trend emerge in many industries and institutions.  From the clergy sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church to the Boy Scouts, Hollywood moguls, celebrities, and powerful politicians, we have witnessed sexual misconduct exposed amid the collective strength of victims who refused to be silenced. Horowitz Law has filed numerous sexual assault lawsuits on behalf of clients who have been a victim of sexual assault or sexual battery. Please contact our law firm at (888) 283-9922 or send an e-mail to sexual abuse lawyer Adam Horowitz for massage clients at adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com for a free consultation.

Boy Scouts Documentary Horowitz Law

New Boy Scouts Documentary Makes Its Scandalous Debut Exploring Decades of Sexual Abuse Cover-Ups

Making its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival on June 9 at 6 PM and available for streaming on June 11, the new boy scouts documentary, “Leave No Trace”, explores the fall of the long-respected Boy Scouts of America organization. The revealing new trailer of this much-anticipated docufilm offers a peek inside the alleged century-long cover-up by the Boy Scouts of America that resulted in over 82,000 men coming forward with sexual abuse allegations against scoutmasters and other authority figures within the Boy Scouts, prompting bankruptcy filings and a record-breaking settlement that rocked the US court system to its core. After premiering at the TFF, Leave No Trace will then debut on Hulu and release theatrically in New York and L.A. on June 16.

The impactful film showcases that beneath the Boy Scouts’ wholesome exterior lies scandals and coverups in shocking proportions. Directed by Oscar nominee and Emmy Winner, Irene Taylor, executive produced by Brian Grazer and Ron Howard, and partnering with ABC News investigators, the 108-minute documentary traces the downfall of the not-so American institution following not only the sex abuse allegations but also the accusations that the organization, which had the support of American presidents, CEOs and community leaders since its founding in 1910, was aware of pedophiles in its ranks for generations and moved them from troop to troop without warning. 

The 2½-minute trailer includes clips of survivors attempting to cope with their trauma and how the trajectory of their lives was shaped by the abuse. Candidly and openly, they discuss what the organization’s principles taught them as young scouts and how the institution their parents trusted betrayed that very trust. One survivor narrates how the abuse began not even a week into him joining his troop, but “the night I got there. I just thought, ‘What is going on? Is this normal?’ “It got much worse from that.”

It also reveals survivor interviews and taped depositions with former organizational leadership that uncover how its executives allegedly put the Boy Scouts’ financial considerations and interests ahead of the safety of tens of thousands of school-aged boys.  

Attorney Adam Horowitz and his team of attorneys handle sexual abuse cases against the Boy Scouts of America at both the local and national levels in your state and nationwide. If you or someone you know was molested during their participation in the Boy Scouts, contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com  to discuss your options today.

John Bruce Larsen Horowitz Law

Central Florida Boy Scouts Executive Arrested on Sexual Battery and Child Molestation Charges

On January 15, 2022, Volusia County police officers arrested John Bruce Larsen, a Central Florida Boy Scouts district executive, for multiple allegations of sexual misconduct with minors. Larsen, age 52, was charged with two counts of sexual battery on a child less than 12 years of age, two counts of sexual battery on a child older than 12 but younger than 18, and four counts of lewd molestation for children under 12. 

According to media reports, the Orange County Sheriff’s Office received multiple allegations that Larsen sexually abused at least three underage boys over an undetermined period of time. The mother of two of the victims told the detectives that one of her sons had been sexually abused by Larsen since he was 8 years old. Her other son also claims Larsen touched him inappropriately while visiting Larsen’s home. 

The third victim described encounters with Larsen to be uncomfortable and that he told Larsen to leave him alone, but he wouldn’t listen. As of now, there is no indication of their current ages or how long this was going on.

According to his LinkedIn profile, John Bruce Larsen served as a district executive for the Boy Scouts’ Central Florida chapter since 2018. It states that he was tasked with developing and implementing educational programs, including STEM. The arrest report said Larsen works with children daily and goes to schools to recruit children to join the boy scouts. Detectives believe that because of the role he held in the community, they believe there could be more victims.

The Boy Scouts of America said they are fully cooperating with law enforcement. Eric Magendatz, CEO of the Boy Scouts of America’s Central Florida Council, released a statement, “The actions alleged to have been committed by John Larsen are reprehensible and opposed to everything for which the Boy Scouts of America stands. Upon learning of these allegations and his arrest, we took immediate action to prohibit him from participation in Scouting.”

As of Friday afternoon, his name has been removed from the online BSA staff list of the Central Florida Council.

The Boy Scouts of America filed for federal bankruptcy protection in February 2020 as a result of numerous lawsuits filed against it for sexual abuse of children by Scoutmasters and others. Attorney Adam Horowitz and his team of attorneys handle sexual abuse cases against the Boy Scouts of America at both the local and national levels in your state and nationwide.  If you or someone you know was molested during their participation in the Boy Scouts, contact Horowitz Law or call us toll-free at (888) 283-9922 now for a free consultation.

Colorado Bill Passed For Child Sexual Abuse Survivors

Colorado Sex Abuse Survivors Now Have Options For Justice

New Colorado Sex Abuse Statute of Limitations Gives Many Survivors Access to Courthouse

In early July, 2021, the State of Colorado became the latest in the wave of states to pass an extension to the statute of limitations on child sex abuse cases. In a landmark move, it re-opened its courts to many survivors of child sexual abuse by creating new legal rights for people sexually abused after January 1, 1960. Previously, all such lawsuits needed to be filed by the time the survivor turned 24, which is far sooner than experts say survivors of sex abuse come forward. 

Starting in January 2022, survivors of sexual abuse in occurring after January 1, 1960, can sue those responsible for the abuse in Colorado’s courts anytime before January 1, 2025.  Under the law, the abuse must have occurred in conjunction with a “youth related activity,” such as the Boy Scouts, church altar boys, or school activity.  However, the definition is broad enough that most survivors will be able to qualify for the court relief.

The law also includes a provision to increase the damages cap on sex abuse claims.  Starting in 2022, survivors of abuse can seek up to $1,000,000 from private entities who enabled their abuse, up significantly from Colorado’s previous cap.

“We commend Colorado lawmakers for recognizing that sexual abuse causes shame, embarrassment, fear, and guilt that many survivors carry well into their adulthood – and that keeps them suffering in silence for decades,” Adam Horowitz, the managing partner of Horowitz Law says of the new law.  “We are seeing a wave of new legislation across America as more and more survivors come forward to demand access to courts to hold those responsible for their nightmare accountable. We can add Colorado to the list of states that are getting it right.”

The new law takes effect on January 1, 2022.

The lawyers of Horowitz Law have represented victims and survivors of sexual abuse in Colorado and nationwide for more than 20 years.  If you were sexually abused in Colorado, contact us now to discuss your legal options. 

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in Colorado.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused as a child in Colorado, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those sexually abused in Colorado now have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.  Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of childhood sexual abuse in Colorado and nationwide.  We can help. 

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Maine sexual abuse Horowitz Law

Maine Opens Courts to All Survivors of Sexual Abuse

New Maine Sexual Abuse Statute of Limitations Gives Survivors of Abuse More Legal Options

On June 21, 2021, the State of Maine became the latest in the wave of states to pass an extension to the statute of limitations on child sexual abuse cases. In a landmark move, it opened a permanent revival window – meaning that civil lawsuits arising from child sexual abuse can be brought anytime, no matter when the abuse occurred.

Previously, only abuse perpetrated after 1987 could be prosecuted in Maine’s civil courts.  This new law does away with the arbitrary deadline. 

Rep. Lori Gramlich, a Democrat from Old Orchard Beach and a longtime social worker, sponsored L.D. 589. In her public testimony on the bill, she disclosed that she is a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, and said that she saw this bill as an opportunity to give others a chance to be heard.

“For me, it’s not about suing somebody for big bunches of money,” Gramlich said. “It’s about having an opportunity to have justice.”

“We commend Maine lawmakers for recognizing that sexual abuse causes shame, embarrassment, fear, and guilt that many survivors carry well into their adulthood – and that keeps them suffering in silence for decades,” Adam Horowitz, the managing partner of Horowitz Law says of the new law.  “We are seeing a wave of new legislation across America as more and more survivors come forward to demand access to courts to hold those responsible for their nightmare accountable. We can add Maine to the list of states that are getting it right.”

The new law takes effect 90 days after the legislature adjourns its current special session.

The lawyers of Horowitz Law have represented victims and survivors of sexual abuse for more than 20 years.  If you were sexually abused in Maine, contact us now to discuss your legal options. 

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in Maine.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused as a child in Maine, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those sexually abused in Maine now have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.  Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of childhood sexual abuse in Maine and nationwide.  We can help. 

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Pennsylvania Moves Towards Justice for Child Sexual Abuse Victims

Pennsylvania Moves Towards Justice for Child Sexual Abuse Victims

House Passes Bill For Justice for Child Sexual Abuse Victims _ Horowitz Law

On Wednesday, January 27, House Bill 14 overwhelmingly passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 187-15, which could lead to a temporary lifting of expired statute of limitations for some child sexual abuse victims, allowing them to file civil suits. The measure would create a two-year window during which civil lawsuits alleging childhood sexual abuse may be filed in court – notwithstanding any statute of limitations that had prevented such filings.  Similar measures have passed in New York, New Jersey, California, North Carolina, and Hawaii among other states.

The bill calls for amending the Pennsylvania constitution to create the “window” for victims to pursue claims, and it will requires voter approval.  It is a companion piece to an effort launched in 2018 by state Rep. Mark Rozzi to reform the state’s child sex crime laws in the wake of a set of stunning investigations into clergy sex abuse in Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania.

If House Bill 14 passes Senate, it could be on the ballot in May 2021. The Pennsylvania Senate judiciary committee has already approved a companion version of the legislation that passed the House Wednesday, and both chambers approved the proposed amendment last legislative session as well. The General Assembly must approve proposed state constitutional amendments in two consecutive sessions.

The proposed amendment to open a window for lawsuits comes after years of campaigning by abuse survivors, including intense lobbying since a 2018 grand jury report revealed that church leaders in six of the state’s Catholic dioceses had covered up abuse by 300 priests that took place over decades. Rozzi, a survivor of childhood abuse inflicted by a member of the Catholic clergy, hailed, “Victims deserve their day in court. Victims have waited long enough.”

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of child sexual abuse throughout Pennsylvania.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused, contact our office today. Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of sexual abuse. We can help.  

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Why are abuse Boy Scouts coming forward now?

Why Are Abused Boy Scouts Coming Forward Now?

Today’s New York Times reports that more than 82,000 individuals report having been sexually abused in the Boy Scouts.

That’s staggering. That’s supposedly more child sex crimes than in the Catholic church (though solid numbers about predators and victims is notoriously hard to come by.)

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/15/us/boy-scouts-abuse-claims-bankruptcy.html?searchResultPosition=1

To what can so much abuse – and so many victims stepping forward – be attributed?

At least some answers to the first question – why so much abuse – are clear

–Predators surely were tempted to become scout leaders because of the countless opportunities for close contact with kids. Hikes, camp-outs, sleepovers tended to happen in small, often two-person tents in remote locations. And few passersby would find it odd or troubling to see an adult scout leader with his hand on a boy’s leg teaching him to bandage a cut or on a boy’s waist showing him how to stand properly when shooting an arrow from a bow.

–Young men can become scout leaders (or more often, assistant scout masters) at the age of eighteen.

–The requirements and time frames to be given scout leadership posts are much less and much quicker than in other occupations near kids (teachers, ministers, police officers, etc.)

–Many parents prod socially inept or shy or unpopular kids into joining the Scouts, the precise kinds of youngsters who are most vulnerable to predators.

–There are more scoutmasters and assistant scoutmasters in the US than there are priests (According to Wikipedia, there are roughly 2.7 million scouts in troops across the US overseen by 800,000 volunteer adult leaders)

So why so many victims stepping forward now? Several reasons:

–The Catholic abuse and cover up crisis spawned groups like SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, which showed many adults (men in particular) that there’s no real shame in having been fooled and violated by a trusted adult.

–The #MeToo movement, though largely involving women, has given many permission to re-examine abuse they suffered and to speak about it and take action.

In particular, the Scouts’ bankruptcy

–has virtually no time constraints (so claimants can and do go back decades and decades).

–is set up so that sexual abuse is broadly defined – so for example scout leaders who exposed themselves to youngsters or showed them pornography (even without physical touch) are included.

-attracts, because of its nationwide scope, very large law firms who are accustomed to mass tort cases (like pharmaceuticals and product liability cases) which have done widespread advertising and effective marketing.

But of course all the hard work and advertising in the world would be meaningless if not for the brave victims who are looking inward, summoning their strength, picking up the phone, sharing their pain, and seeking help from independent sources.

So we at Horowitz Law applaud every one of the 82,000 men and women who have so far helped shine a healing light on abuse and cover ups in this widespread, once-universally popular organization.

What now?

If we may offer some advice to these courageous scout survivors. Get organized! Look to the inspiring work done by Catholic survivors who’ve gotten together under the banner of SNAP, an extraordinarily effective group.  For more than 30 years, SNAP’s volunteer local leaders, mostly survivors themselves, have pushed for statute of limitations (SOL) reform in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Illinois, Colorado, New York, Delaware, Missouri, Guam, Hawaii, Washington DC and elsewhere.

They’ve publicly denounced backsliding on SOL laws in states like South Dakota.

https://www.snapnetwork.org/child_sex_victims_blast_sd_legislative_panel

They’ve also advocated for state RICO laws and tougher mandatory reporting laws.

They’ve written parole boards urging that predators be kept behind bars.

But perhaps most valuable of all: They’ve provided a safe, welcoming and inclusive place for deeply wounded individuals to band together and get healing. They’ve given frustrated survivors a productive, safe outlet for their pain and anger.

And they’ve made a huge difference for kids.

But only because they’ve been smart and persistent and joined forces.

We at Horowitz Law hope survivors in scouting and other institutional settings do likewise.

Br. Kevin Dunne – Archdiocese of Los Angeles

Brother Kevin Dunne 

Archdiocese of Los Angeles

Kevin Dunne  Archdiocese of Los Angeles Horowitz Law

Ordained: N/A 

Died: 2010

Assigned as follows:

  • Los Angeles Central County Jail
  • St. Anthony Seminary (Santa Barbara, CA) 
  • St. Mary’s Basilica (Phoenix, AZ)

Summary of Abuse Allegations against Brother Kevin Dunne:

Brother Kevin Dunne was a member of the Franciscan religious order, and served in multiple parishes in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. According to media reports, in October 2003, he was named in a civil lawsuit alleging he had sexually abused a student at St. Anthony Seminary in Santa Barbara from 1970 to 1971. 

Per a 2002 article, he was living with several order members at St. Mary’s Basilica in Phoenix, serving as their treasurer, doing housework and without contact with children.

As of 2007, Brother Dunne was living in a retreat house near Monterey in failing health and with dementia.  A civil suit filed in 2009 alleged that despite the Franciscan order knowing that he raped a St. Anthony’s student, he was transferred to St. Mary’s Basilica in Phoenix where he lived with other order members. 

In January 2019, Brother Dunne’s name was included on the Diocese of Santa Rosa’s list of clergy credibly accused of child sexual abuse. It notes accusations in 2002 for abuse elsewhere in 1993. It also notes that he died in 2010.

In May 2019, Brother Dunne’s name was included on the Santa Barbara Province Franciscans list of clergy credibly accused of child sexual abuse. It notes a report in 1993 of alleged sexual abuse of a minor 1970-73. That following month in June, his name was included on the Diocese of Las Cruces’ list  (misspelled Dunn), where he worked 1955-61. He is also on the Diocese of Phoenix’s list, however, no known allegations were reported there.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest or other Catholic clergy in California State, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles now have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.  Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of clergy sexual abuse in Los Angeles and nationwide. We can help.

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Boy Scout Leaders and Clergymen Have More in Common Than You May Know

Like many clergy, Scout leaders are often thought of as selfless men, generously sharing their time and talent with youngsters.

Like many clergy, they often have seemingly legitimate reasons to be alone with kids.

Like many clergy, Scout leaders belong to a rigid, male-dominated, hierarchical group.

Like many clergy, they are often seen as ‘good influences’ on kids, especially troubled kids.

Like many clergy, they often wear decorated uniforms that enhance their seemingly superior images.

Like many clergy, Scout leaders sometimes posture as ‘pillars of the community,’ which makes reporting wrongdoing even tougher.

Like many clergy, Scout leaders care deeply about their institution and its reputation and public relations.

Like many clergy, Scout leaders are surrounded by peers and superiors who feel a strong temptation to ignore, hide or minimize wrongdoing.

And tragically, like many clergy, many Scout leaders have hurt the children they purportedly serve, leaving deep and permanent scars.

Almost as tragically, like many clergy, many Scout leaders were known or suspected child molesters but were left in place by colleagues and supervisors who found it easier to ‘hear no, speak no, see no’ evil, rather than courageously confront, report and stop evil in their midst.

The result: thousands of devastated lives and stolen childhoods and avoidable lifelong suffering.

Just how widespread is all this? “The Boy Scouts have long kept confidential files on volunteers who were credibly accused of abuse. One expert hired by the organization found that there had been nearly 8,000 complaints over a span of decades,” reports the New York Times.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/23/nyregion/boy-scouts-sex-abuse.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/19/us/boy-scouts-bankruptcy-assets.html?searchResultPosition=4

The dam began to break more than a decade ago, when a brave man, Kerry Lewis found a brave attorney, Kelly Clark. (Clark has since passed away, without seeing the full fruit of his ground-breaking work to expose wrongdoing in Scouting).

According to one news account, Lewis “said he had been molested by an assistant scoutmaster, Timur Dykes, in the early 1980s. Mr. Dykes, who had served time for child abuse, had admitted to a Mormon bishop that he had molested several scouts. The bishop alerted the families of Mr. Dykes’s victims but did not warn the other boys in the troop or the authorities. Mr. Dykes was soon able to volunteer with the Scouts again.”

“They knew that their charismatic assistant scout leader Timur Dykes, to whom kids flocked like bees to honey, had admitted to molesting 17 scouts, including Cub Scouts,” said Mr. Clark.

Then, exactly a decade ago, the pair won this pivotal case at the Oregon Supreme Court.

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/21/us/kelly-clark-a-lawyer-who-won-a-pivotal-abuse-case-against-the-boy-scouts-dies-at-56.html?searchResultPosition=1

“Crucial to the suit’s success were more than 12,000 pages of internal Boy Scout documents that implicated more than 1,200 scout leaders in sexual abuse from 1965 to 1985,” wrote the New York Times. “They also revealed an organizational practice of handling such accusations internally and minimizing publicity. Lawyers for the Boy Scouts said the files were kept confidential to protect the victims.

Two years later, news organizations, including The Oregonian, The Associated Press and The New York Times, demanded that the files be made public. The Boy Scouts filed a motion to prevent their release, but the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that the public had a right to see them.

Thousands of victims have since stepped forward, taking back the power that was ripped from them as boys.

How has the national Scouting organization responded to this flood of long-overdue abuse and cover up lawsuits?

Sadly, like Catholic officials, it has cried ‘bankruptcy,’ and is exploiting Chapter 11 laws to evade responsibility and keep the truth concealed.

Still, those who were betrayed and abused in Scout troops and camps across the U.S. can achieve some measure of justice, healing and closure through the legal process.

We at Horowitz Law already represent over two hundred former Scouts making abuse claims in the bankruptcy court against the Boys Scouts of America. We stand ready to help you too.

Horowitz Law is Now Investigating Cases Involving Alan Morris and the Boy Scouts

Alan Richard Morris Horowitz law

In January 1987, Alan Richard Morris pleaded guilty in a Florida court to multiple counts of sexual misconduct involving four young boys.  Morris, an Assistant Scoutmaster and Webelos Den Leader with the Boy Scouts of America, often held “special” Boy Scout meetings at his home where he would show his Scouts pornography and teach them to masturbate.  Sometimes, Morris brought boys into a separate room to engage them in more serious sexual contact.

According to court documents, Morris was charged for incidents occurring between July 1985 and March 1986.  The victims identified in the charging documents ranged in age from 12 to 15.  They were all members of Boy Scout Troop 86, chartered by the First Baptist Church in Cape Coral.

Morris, a married father of five children at the time, told his victims that his wife would leave him or divorce him if she found out about the misconduct.  He swore them to secrecy by making them think that they would all get in trouble if anyone found out.

An arrest warrant was issued for Morris in the summer of 1986, but he fled to Maine before he could be arrested by Florida law enforcement.  He was eventually arrested in Maine and extradited back to Cape Coral to stand trial in August 1986.

According to the Boy Scouts’ secret Ineligible Volunteer (IV) file for Morris, he resided at 1618 Viscaya Parkway in Cape Coral at the time of the misconduct.  Morris’ IV file was one of many files that a Court ordered the Boy Scouts to produce in a lawsuit against the Boy Scouts for sexual abuse.

The Boy Scouts of America filed for federal bankruptcy protection in February 2020 as a result of numerous lawsuits filed against it for sexual abuse of children by Scoutmasters and others.  Horowitz Law represents victims of Alan Morris and many other adult volunteers in the bankruptcy proceeding.  We can help you too, but you must contact us today to discuss your options.  Strict filing deadlines have now been set by the bankruptcy court and if you miss the deadlines, you may miss out on your very last chance to hold the Boy Scouts accountable for what happened to you.  Contact us now.

Attorney Adam Horowitz and his team of attorneys handle sexual abuse cases against the Boy Scouts of America at both the local and national level in your state and nationwide.  If you or someone you know was molested during their participation in the Boy Scouts, email Horowitz Law or call us toll-free at (888) 283-9922 now.  The Boy Scouts have filed for federal bankruptcy protection.  Strict filing deadlines have been set by the United States Bankruptcy Court.  Do not risk missing out on your very last chance to hold the Boy Scouts accountable for its misconduct and deliberate decisions to put boys like you at risk.