Msgr. John P. Bolen – Diocese of Harrisburg

Msgr. John Bolen – Diocese of Harrisburg

Ordained: 1926

Died: 1966

Assigned as follows:

  • St. Ignatius (Centralia, PA)
  • St. James (Steelton, PA)
  • Villa Sacred Heart
  • Academy Of Saints Cyril and Methodius (Danville, PA)
  • St. Patrick (Trevorton, PA)
  • Sacred Heart (Conewago, PA)
  • Mount St. Mary’s Seminary

Summary of Allegations against Fr. John P. Bolen:

Msgr. John P. Bolen’s name first appeared on the Diocese of Harrisburg’s August 2018 list of credibly accused priests.  Very little information was provided about the allegation(s) against Msgr. Bolen, except to say that he was first accused of abuse after his death in 1966.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg now have legal options to recover damages due to a compensation fund created for victims.  Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com today.

Fr. James W. Beeman – Diocese of Harrisburg

Fr. James W. Beeman- Diocese of Harrisburg

Fr. James Beeman   Father James Beeman

Ordained: 1953

Removed from ministry: 1991

Inpatient evaluation: 1991

Restricted to life of prayer: 2014

Died: 2016

Assigned as follows:

  • 1953-1958        St. Mary (Lancaster, PA)
  • 1958-1959        St. Patrick (Carlisle, PA)
  • 1959-1961        St. Joseph (Danville, PA)
  • 1961-1964        St. Columba (Bloomsburg, PA)
  • 1964-1968        Our Lady of Visitation (Shippensburg, PA)
  • 1968            St. Joseph (Milton, PA)
  • 1968            St. Ignatius (Centralia, PA)
  • 1968-1969        St. Francis of Assisi (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1969-1973        Our Lady of Blessed Sacrament (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1969-1973        St. Columba (Bloomsburg, PA)
  • 1975            “inner city ministry”
  • 1975            Sacred Heart (Williamstown, PA)
  • 1975-1977        “inner city ministry”
  • 1977-1983        Our Lady of Blessed Sacrament (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1980            “inner city ministry”
  • 1980-1991        Chaplain, Harrisburg State Hospital
  • 1983-1991        Chaplain, State Correctional Institution (Camp Hill, PA)

Our investigation also revealed that he had ties to Lancaster Catholic High School and Bishop McDevitt High School during his tenure as an active priest as well.

Summary of Allegations against Fr. James Beeman:

According to an August 2018 press release from the Diocese of Harrisburg, Fr. James Beeman was known to be a serial child abuser at least as early 1988.  The Diocese itself reported him to local law enforcement for sexual abuse. Given that the clerical culture generally requires secrecy and cover-up, such a move would have been highly unusual and speaks to what must have been a particularly heinous situation.  However, no details about the allegations were offered by the Diocese of Harrisburg, so we are left to speculate about what may have happened.

Based upon our experience, we do see “red flags” in Beeman’s assignment history that suggest the Diocese of Harrisburg may have been aware of Beeman’s deviant behavior far earlier than 1988. For example, his two stints at unspecified “inner city ministry” are consistent with sudden and vague transfers to new locations following allegations of abuse, among populations who are not likely to raise the alarm in the event of abuse for various reasons.  Sadly, Catholic Church leaders often hid predators among those who struggled for reasons of race, education, or economics but for whom the faith is strong. It is not uncommon to see a predator assigned to a parish made up largely of undocumented Hispanic immigrants, for example. The thought is that they are not as likely to cause “trouble” in the case of abuse for fear of criminal repercussions or angering God himself due to the depth of their faith.

According to the 2018 grand jury report, in 1991, a mother approached the Diocese of Harrisburg to report that Fr. James Beeman abused her daughter from 1961 to 1964 while he was assigned to St. Columba in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania.  The mother recalled seeing blood in her daughter’s underwear when she was eight years old. The daughter later told Diocese of Harrisburg officials that she was sexually abused by Beeman on four occasions from 1961-1973:

The first incident occurred during Catechism class.  He set up a projector to watch a film and, while it was dark, he had the girl sit on his lap and fondled her;

At age seven, she had her tonsils removed.  Beeman came to visit her at the hospital when her parents were not around and he raped her;

At age 13, he came to her family home when her parents were not home and raped her again; and

At age 19, and while she was pregnant, Beeman raped her a third time.

When confronted by Diocese of Harrisburg officials about the woman’s allegations, Beeman admitted to them.  His priestly faculties were revoked and, consistent with the Diocese of Harrisburg’s modus operandi when priests admitted to abuse, he was sent for a psychological assessment to determine his fitness for ministry.  As part of his sexual history, Beeman disclosed that he abused another girls, starting when she was 6 years old (from 1953 to 1958) by fondling her genitals.  He admitted to fondling the genitals of another 6 year old girl on multiple occasions in 1968. He admitted to fondling a third 6 year old girl multiple times in 1972.

In 2002, the victim abused from 1953 to 1958 came forward to the Diocese of Harrisburg.  Beeman again admitted to her allegations and said that he a “deep love” for the six-year-old child, and that he felt he was probably “still in love with her.”  He even kept photos of her from that time period – he eventually gave the Bishop seven photos, some of which were even framed. He admitted to sexually abusing at least seven other young girls during his tenure in the Diocese of Harrisburg.

In 2014, upon a request from the Diocese of Harrisburg, the Vatican issued a papal precept restricting Beeman to a life of “penance and prayer” for his misdeeds.  The Grand Jury report does not offer an explanation as to why the Diocese of Harrisburg suddenly sought papal intervention almost 25 years after the 1991 allegations.  The same 2018 press release that discussed the Diocese’s 1988 report to police indicated that the new, incoming Bishop (Robert Gainer) sought to make the restrictions already in place more permanent and ongoing since he could not seek laicization of the priest (due to Beeman’s declining health).  Apparently the Vatican agreed due to the scandal that returning him to ministry might create.

In 2016, another woman reported her abuse by Beeman to the Diocese of Harrisburg.  As in other cases, she reported that she was forced to sit on his lap and that he touched her inappropriately.

Beeman died in October 2016 in Florida from complications of Parkinson’s Disease.  He donated his body to science.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg now have legal options to recover damages due to a compensation fund created for victims.  Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com today.

Fr. Francis Bach – Diocese of Harrisburg

Fr. Francis Bach – Diocese of Harrisburg

Fr. Francis Bach

Ordained: 1962

Relieved of youth related duties: 1967

Resigned/Retired: 1994

Removed from priesthood (laicized): 2007

Died: 2010

Assigned as follows:
  • 1962-1964        St. Theresa (Cumberland, PA)
  • 1964-1965        St. Patrick (York,PA)
  • 1965-1970        St. Patrick’s Cathedral (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1970            St. Joseph (Danville, PA)
  • 1970            Boy Scout Chaplain (appointed)
  • 1970            Coordinator, Family Life Apostolate (Diocese HQ)
  • 1971-1975        Campus Minister, Millersville University
  • 1974-1975        St. Joan of Arc (Hershey, PA)
  • 1975-1976        St. Rose of Lima (York, PA)
  • 1976            Leave of Absence
  • 1976-1977        Annunciation BVM (McSherrystown, PA)
  • 1977-1980        Holy Family (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1980-1983        Assumption BVM (Lebanon, PA)
  • 1983-1994        Assumption BVM/Our Lady of Fatima Mission (Lebanon, PA)
  • 1994            Resigned/retired

 

Summary of Allegations against Fr. Francis Bach:

Much of the information about the allegations against Fr. Francis Bach come from the 2007 laicization petition submitted by the Diocese of Harrisburg to the Vatican, seeking Bach’s removal from the priesthood.  In such a petition, the Diocese sets forth all the reasons that a priest should be returned to the lay state similar to the way a prosecutor would set forth facts supporting an indictment of a criminal defendant.

According to the the petition, the Diocese of Harrisburg received a 1994 report of abuse by a man who said that Bach abused him as a 13 year old boy in 1969.  Bach invited the boy to his boat in Maryland. In the middle of the night, the boy awoke to Bach fondling his penis, and that it progressed to oral sex and taking photographs of the boy while he was naked.  Bach neither admitted nor denied the incident when confronted by Diocese officials; instead, he admitted that there were multiple incidents of similar behavior. He agreed to retire from active ministry in light of the scandal that could come to the Church if he continued in ministry.

Following his removal from ministry, Bach was sent to Villa St. John Vianney, a notorious pedophile priest treatment center in Downington, Pennsylvania.  During his evaluation, he admitted to abusing at least 14 boys aged 14-16 during his priesthood.

In 2002, the Diocese of Harrisburg received a new report from a man who was also abused on Bach’s boat in Maryland and at the Cathedral in Harrisburg during the 1970s.

In 2007, another man contacted the Diocese of Harrisburg, who reported multiple instances of sexual abuse by Bach.  At the time, the man was 12. No details were provided by the grand jury as to the date or Bach’s parish assignment during the time.  The incidents with this boy occurred at a motel and included sodomy of the child. He was later abused on Bach’s boat as well.

In 2009, yet another man reported his sexual abuse by Bach to the Diocese of Harrisburg.  He reported that he too was taken to a motel on multiple occasions and sexual assaulted by Bach, including sodomy.  Reportedly, when confronted with this particular allegation, Bach responded that he could not remember the incidents but, “with my history, anything is possible.  I’m not saying he is fabricating the story.” Bach’s assignment at the time of the abuse was not provided by the grand jury.

In 2016, another many contacted the Diocese of Harrisburg to report being abused in 1960 as an 8-year-old altar boy at St. Patrick in York, Pennsylvania.

According to the grand jury report and several victims of Fr. Joseph Pease, Bach and Pease owned a boat together and often used it to abuse boys.  The two were also know to “share” victims.

According to the 2007 laicization petition, the Diocese of Harrisburg did not want the matter to be subject to a Canonical trial because it could bring scandal to the Church if the allegations were aired.  Bishop Rhodes wrote, “…the true reason Francis Bach left all priestly ministry is unknown to others. If his case is now brought to trial or given any kind of publicity, I fear it will cause scandal to many, as he is still a priest who is beloved by many in our diocese.”  The Vatican agreed and Bach was eventually laicized quietly.

While the petition does not mention any incidents during these time periods, there are multiple red flags in Bach’s assignment history that suggest, in our experience, that the Diocese of Harrisburg was aware of allegations against Bach well before 1994.  In 1967, he was relieved of all duties relating to Youth Ministry, which is certainly unusual unless there was concern about his interaction with the children he encountered. Moreover, he has an unexplained leave of absence in 1976 that does not appear to be for any type of educational or professional development.  In our experience, the length and abruptness of the leave certainly suggest that it may have been related to allegations of abuse. Of course, these issues would be examined more closely in litigation to determine the reason for these maneuvers with certainty.

Bach died in 2010.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg now have legal options to recover damages due to a compensation fund created for victims.  Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com today.

 

Fr. John G. Allen – Diocese of Harrisburg

Fr. John G. Allen (Diocese of Harrisburg)

Fr. John Allen

Ordained: 1970

Inpatient evaluation: 1991

Arrested: 1992

Resigned: 2002

Named in Civil Lawsuits: 2002, 2005, 2018

Laicized (removed from priesthood): 2006

Assigned as follows:
  • 1970-1971        Assumption BVM (Lebanon, PA)
  • 1971-1976        St. Patrick (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1976            St. Francis Xavier (Gettysburg, PA)
  • 1976-1978        St. Francis of Assisi (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 1978-1980        St. Ann (Steelton, PA)
  • 1980-1986        St. Pius X (Selinsgrove, PA)
  • 1986-1992        St. Joseph (Lancaster, PA)
  • 1991            Inpatient Evaluation – Villa St. John Vianney
  • 1992-1993        Leave of Absence
  • 1993-1995        St. Theresa (Cumberland, PA)
  • 1995-2002        St. Margaret Mary (Harrisburg, PA)
  • 2002            Resigned after credible allegation of abuse
Summary of Allegations against Fr. John G. Allen:

According to the 2018 Grand Jury report, the Diocese of Harrisburg first became aware of problematic sexual behavior as early as January 1970, several months before he was ordained, but no details are offered as to the knowledge or diocesan response.  From our experience, the pre-ordination evaluation of predator priests sometimes contains code words that suggest the candidate is struggling with the idea of celibacy or that he seems “too interested” in the younger seminarians. While we cannot definitively say this was the case with Fr. Allen without having seen his personnel file, it is clear that something in the records raised concerns for the Grand Jury.  At any rate, he was ordained in spite of the problems.

In 1991, Allen was sent for an inpatient evaluation at the notorious treatment facility for pedophile priests, Villa St. John Vianney, in Downington, Pennsylvania.  Again, the Grand Jury does not offer details as to why this step was taken, but it is typically done after there have been multiple allegations made any all attempts at internal diocesan corrective action has failed.  Therefore, we suspect that Allen may have been the subject of allegations (or rumors/suspicions) throughout the 1970s and 1980s.

In 1992, several months after his evaluation at St. John Vianney and after he had been returned to parish ministry, Allen was arrested by Lancaster Police for solicitation of an undercover police officer (prostitution).  The event was brought to the attention of the Diocese of Harrisburg by several parishioners at St. Joseph’s parish in Lancaster who were familiar with the case. They also mentioned that Allen was inviting altar boys into his bedroom at the parish rectory.   Allen was put on a leave of absence. He eventually pled guilty and paid a small fine.

In 1993, another priest informed then-Bishop Nicholas Dattilo that he had “received information” that Allen attended a Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA) meeting and confessed that he was a pedophile who had “an obsession with young boys.”  He was assigned to a new parish – St. Theresa in Cumberland, Pennsylvania.

He remained in parish ministry for nearly 10 more years until 2002, when another man came forward to report to the Diocese of Harrisburg that he had been sexually abused by Allen from ages 14-18.  The teenager was not a parishioner, but rather a boy that Allen initially “picked up” on the street in Harrisburg. Allen engaged him in sexual contact 10-15 times, including fondling, oral sex, and mutual masturbation.  In response, the Diocese of Harrisburg restricted Allen’s priestly faculties and he eventually resigned from ministry.

In early 2003, another man reported to the Diocese of Harrisburg that he was sexually abused as a teenager by Allen at St. Pius X in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.  He also witnessed Allen abuse other teen boys at the parish. The victim reported that they each received $40 or $50 to go to the rectory, sit in a circle around a candle, and masturbate while Allen watched.  The man also reported that Allen brought him to a motel in Harrisburg where they engaged in mutual fondling and oral sex. Allen paid the boy for the sexual contact. After the man turned 18, and after Allen was transferred to St. Joseph in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Allen would arrange for the young man to come to visit.  Again, Allen paid him for all manners of sexual contact.

In 2015, another man reported that he was sexually abused while he was an altar server at St. Patrick in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, around 1971.  Allen brought the boy to his private quarters in the rectory and pressured him into a game of strip poker. The report does not indicate if there was any type of touching.

In March 2019, Allen was arrested and charged with sexually abusing two former altar boys between 1997 and 2002, while he was assigned to St. Margaret Mary in Harrisburg.  The criminal proceedings are still open.

Allen has been named in at least three civil lawsuits relating to sexual abuse.

Allen was removed from the priesthood (laicized) in 2006.  He is 75 years old and has been residing in York, according to media reports.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg may have legal options against the Diocese of Harrisburg.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com today.

Archdiocese of Philadelphia logo

Sexually abused by a priest in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia? Talk to a lawyer today.

Our law firm is offering free, confidential evaluation of clergy sexual abuse claims involving priests of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.  We have been handling clergy abuse cases for many years. Contact us today at (954) 641-2100 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to find out if you are eligible for compensation.

The facts are clear: the Archdiocese of Philadelphia engaged in the coverup of the sexual abuse of children for decades.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has been home to some of the most notorious priests alleged to have committed child sexual abuse in the nation. Thanks to not one but two landmark grand jury reports released in the last 15 years those facts are now coming to light.  Of course, they would not have been possible without the strength and courage of the countless survivors who came forward to call the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to account.

Both the civil lawsuits that have been filed against the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the extensive grand jury reports into the practices of the Archdiocese have exposed a culture of sexual abuse, cover-up, and efforts by church to protect the reputation of the Archdiocese at the expense of its most vulnerable: the children in its flock.  The grand jury reports each reveal mountains of evidence of sexual abuse of minors committed by dozens of priests in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, as well as the shocking steps taken by Church leaders to cover up the sexual abuse of children. These findings led to the arrest and eventual conviction of several Church leaders for endangering children for the first time in our nation’s history.

According to the 2011 report, Msgr. William Lynn, who was the Archbishop’s Secretary for Clergy from 1992-2004 and was responsible for investigating allegations of sexual abuse during that time, was particularly culpable.  The Grand Jury stated, “the rapist priests we accuse were well known to the Secretary of the Clergy, but he cloaked their conduct and put them in place to do it again.” Lynn was later convicted of endangerment of a child and sentenced to three to six years in prison.  He testified on his own behalf at his trial, explaining that he reassigned one accused priest to another parish (where the priest abused more kids) because the case “just fell through the cracks.”

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has established a voluntary compensation fund for survivors of sexual abuse in Philadelphia, but you must act soon.

Anyone sexually abused by a priest in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia may now be able to receive financial compensation without undergoing lengthy, protracted litigation in court.  Recently, the Archbishop of Philadelphia, Charles Chaput, announced that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has formed a confidential, voluntary compensation settlement fund for victims of sexual abuse by clergy of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.  The fund, which is modeled after similar funds in New York, will compensate victims in a shorter, more cursory process than full-blown litigation. Kenneth Feinberg, a well-known and respected arbitrator of the New York claims and other high-profile claim funds like the 9/11 Fund, and his business manager, Camille Biros, will review each claim as a neutral third party and award claimants compensation.  We have extensive experience handling claims in the New York area and are very familiar with the process and expectations of Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros.

There will be a deadline to file your claim with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, so it is important that you act today to protect your rights.  Contact us today.

We have identified 133 Catholic priests and deacons accused of sexually abusing minors in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Through our own investigation, we have identified a staggering 133 priests publicly accused of sexually abusing children in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The following list of priests and deacons includes habitual offenders and other priests who allegedly committed abuse.  In some cases, priests were alleged to have abused children at multiple parishes and were transferred from assignment to assignment even after the allegations first came to the attention of the leaders of the Archdiocese:

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia may have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so please do not delay in reaching out to us.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Diocese of Scranton sexual abuse lawyer

Sexually Abused by a priest in the Diocese of Scranton? Talk to a lawyer today.

Our law firm is offering free, confidential evaluations of clergy sexual abuse claims involving priests of the Diocese of Scranton.  We have been handling clergy abuse cases for many years and have the experience you need to seek justice for what happened to you. Contact us today at (954) 641-2100 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to find out your legal options.

The facts are clear: the Diocese of Scranton engaged in the coverup of the sexual abuse of children for decades.

The Diocese of Scranton has been home to some of the most notorious priests alleged to have committed child sexual abuse. Thanks to a recent scathing grand jury report, the facts are now coming to light about how the Diocese officials, including its bishops, protected predator priests, not the innocent children in its flock.  Victims of abuse by priests in the Diocese of Scranton may be able to seek justice in a court of law for what occurred.

The Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report reveals mountains of evidence of sexual abuse of minors committed by dozens of priests in the Diocese of Scranton.  This sexual abuse included grooming and fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, or anus.

The civil lawsuits that have been filed against the Diocese of Scranton and the extensive Grand Jury Report into the practices of the Diocese of Scranton have exposed a culture of sexual abuse, cover-up, and efforts by church to protect the reputation of the Diocese of Scranton even if it meant putting children in harm’s way. The Grand Jury report identified a staggering 59 priests accused of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Scranton.  Under pressure from the general public and fellow bishops to release the identities of all priests credibly accused of sexual misconduct with minors, Bishop Joseph Bambera released the names of 73 credibly accused or admitted clergy and non-clergy affiliates of the Diocese of Scranton.

Quite disturbingly, it has since been publicly revealed that former Diocese of Scranton Bishops J. Carroll McCormick, Jerome Hannan, and James Timlin each failed to stop multiple instances of clergy child abuse when the priests’ misconduct was credibly reported to the Diocese of Scranton.  In addition, they each failed to timely report the overwhelming amount of reports received to law enforcement.  As a result, the president of the University of Scranton recently announced that buildings named for three former bishops of the Diocese of Scranton will be renamed. This follows the decision of Bishop Bambera to remove the names of the three former Bishops of the Diocese from all church buildings.  The Diocese of Scranton also announced that Bishop Emeritus James Timlin will no longer represent the diocese at public events.

The Diocese of Scranton has established a voluntary compensation fund for survivors of sexual abuse in Scranton, but you must act soon.

Recently, the Bishop of Scranton, Joseph Bambera, announced that the Diocese of Scranton has formed a confidential, voluntary compensation settlement fund for victims of sexual abuse by clergy of the Diocese of Scranton.  The fund, which is modeled after similar funds in New York, will compensate victims in a shorter, more cursory process than full-blown litigation. Respected attorney Kenneth Feinberg, who administered the New York claims and other high profile, sensitive claims like the 9/11 Fund, and his business manager, Camille Biros, will review each claim as a neutral third party and award compensation.  We have extensive experience handling claims in the New York funds and are very familiar with the process and expectations of Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros in the process.

All claims must be registered by July 31, 2019, so it is extremely important that you act today to protect your rights under the fund.  Contact us today.

We have identified 79 priests accused of sexually abusing children in the Diocese of Scranton.

Through our own research, we have identified 79 priests, 1 nun, and 5 lay employees who worked in the Diocese of Scranton who have been credibly accused or who have admitted to abusing kids. The list below includes many habitual re-offenders and other priests who allegedly committed abuse.  In some cases, priests were alleged to have abused kids at multiple parishes:

Contact us today.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Scranton.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Scranton may have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Diocese of Pittsburgh logo

Sexually abused by a priest of the Diocese of Pittsburgh? Talk to a lawyer today

Our law firm is offering free, confidential evaluations of clergy sexual abuse claims involving priests of the Diocese of Pittsburgh.  We have been handling clergy abuse cases for many years and have the experience you need to seek justice for what happened to you. Contact us today at (954) 641-2100 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to find out your legal options.

The facts are clear: the Diocese of Pittsburgh engaged in the coverup of the sexual abuse of children for decades.

The Diocese of Pittsburgh has been home to some of the most notorious priests alleged to have committed child sexual abuse. Thanks to a recent scathing grand jury report, the facts are now coming to light about how the Diocese officials, including its bishops, protected predator priests before the innocent children in its flock.  Victims of abuse by priests in the Diocese of Pittsburgh may be able to seek justice in a court of law or through a voluntary settlement fund for what occurred.

The Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report reveals mountains of evidence of sexual abuse of minors committed by dozens of priests in the Diocese of Pittsburgh.  This sexual abuse included grooming and fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, or anus. According to the 2018 Grand Jury Report,

“The Grand Jury uncovered evidence of child sexual abuse committed by dozens of priests, and in one case an aspiring priest, in the Diocese of Pittsburgh. This sexual abuse included grooming and fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, or anus. The evidence also showed that Diocesan administrators, including bishops, had knowledge of this conduct yet regularly placed the priests in ministry after the Diocese was on notice that a complaint of child sexual abuse had been made.  This conduct was enabling to the offenders and endangered the welfare of children.

                *  * *

Finally, the Grand Jury received evidence that several Diocesan administrators, including bishops, often dissuaded victims from reporting to police, or conducted their own deficient, biased investigating without reporting crimes against children to the proper authorities.”

The civil lawsuits that have been filed against the Diocese of Pittsburgh and the extensive Grand Jury Report into the practices of the Diocese of Pittsburgh have exposed a culture of sexual abuse and cover-up, and efforts by church to protect the reputation of the Diocese of Pittsburgh even if it meant putting children in harm’s way. The Grand Jury report identified a staggering 99 priests accused of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Pittsburgh over the last 70 years.  Under pressure from the general public and fellow bishops to release the identities of all priests credibly accused of sexual misconduct with minors, the Diocese of Pittsburgh recently released the names of 84 priests accused of sexual abuse of minors, with the caveat that the Diocese considers the allegations against 8 of those men to be “unsubstantiated.” The grand jury report has been redacted to conceal the identities of another 8 priests who are fighting their inclusion in the grand jury report, so the entire list of the 99 priests may not have been fully revealed.  As we discuss below, our investigation has identified 118 priests accused of sexual misconduct with minors in the Diocese of Pittsburgh.

The Diocese of Pittsburgh has established a voluntary compensation fund for survivors of sexual abuse in Pittsburgh, but you must act soon.

Recently, the Bishop of Pittsburgh, David Zubik, announced that the Diocese of Pittsburgh has formed a confidential, voluntary compensation settlement fund for victims of sexual abuse by clergy of the Diocese of Pittsburgh.  The fund, which is modeled after similar funds in New York, will compensate victims in a shorter, more cursory process than full-blown litigation. Respected attorney Kenneth Feinberg, who administered the New York claims and other high profile, sensitive claims like the 9/11 Fund, and his business manager, Camille Biros, will review each claim as a neutral third party and award compensation.  We have extensive experience handling claims in the New York area and are very familiar with the process and expectations of Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros in the process.

There will be a deadline by which all claims must be filed with the Diocese of Pittsburgh, so it is important that you act today to protect your rights under the fund.  Contact us today.

We have identified 118 priests publicly accused of sexually abusing children in the Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Through our own research, we have identified more than 100 priests assigned to the Diocese of Pittsburgh who have been accused of or who have admitted to abusing kids. The list of priests below includes many habitual re-offenders and other priests who allegedly committed abuse.  In some cases, priests were alleged to have abused kids at multiple parishes:

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Pittsburgh.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Pittsburgh may have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Diocese of Harrisburg logo - Horowitz Law

Sexually abused by a priest in the Diocese of Harrisburg? Talk to a lawyer today.

Our law firm is offering free, confidential evaluations of sexual abuse claims involving Catholic priests in the Diocese of Harrisburg (Pennsylvania).  Our team has been handling clergy sexual abuse claims for decades. Contact us today at (954) 641-2100 or by email at adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to find out your legal options.

The facts are clear: the Diocese of Harrisburg enabled and concealed the sexual abuse of children for decades.  

The Diocese of Harrisburg (Pennsylvania) has been home to dozens of priests accused of sexually abusing children over the course of decades.  A recent grand jury report outlined allegations involving 45 priests. Many others have been publicly identified by brave sexual abuse survivors who pursued legal action against the Diocese of Harrisburg to hold it accountable for shielding and protecting abusers above the children entrusted to their care.

Both civil lawsuits and grand jury reports involving the Diocese of Harrisburg have shed light on the practices of the Diocese of Harrisburg in responding to allegations of sexual misconduct.  The facts suggest that the Diocese of Harrisburg is responsible for creating a dangerous culture of sexual abuse and coverup, and fostering a dangerous environment for children despite being in a position to protect God’s most innocent people.  According to the grand jury report:

“The Grand Jury uncovered evidence of child sexual abuse committed by priests of the Diocese of Harrisburg. Evidence established that priests engaged in sexual contact with minors, including grooming and fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, or anus. The evidence also revealed that Diocesan administrators, including bishops, had knowledge of this conduct and that priests were regularly placed in ministry after the Diocese was on notice that a complaint of child sexual abuse had been made.  The Diocese’s actions enabled the offenders and endangered the welfare of children.

                *  * *

Finally, the Grand Jury received evidence that several Diocesan administrators, including bishops, often dissuaded victims from reporting to police, or conducted their own deficient, biased investigating without reporting crimes against children to the proper authorities.”

Ahead of the grand jury report, the Diocese of Harrisburg released the names of 71 priests, seminarians, and laypersons accused of sexually abusing children since 1941.  You can find out more information about many of these priests below.

The Diocese of Harrisburg has established a voluntary compensation fund for survivors of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Harrisburg, but you must act soon.

Recently, the Bishop of Harrisburg, Ronald Gainer, announced that the Diocese of Harrisburg has formed a confidential, voluntary compensation settlement fund for victims of sexual abuse by clergy of the Diocese of Harrisburg. The fund, which is modeled after similar funds in New York, will compensate victims in a shorter, more cursory process than full-blown litigation.  We have handled hundreds of claims in these funds and are familiar with the process and the expectations.

The fund will be administered by Boston-based Commonwealth Mediation and Conciliation, Inc., a third-party neutral, who will evaluate each of the claims for eligibility and value.

All claims must be registered with the administrators by May 12, 2019, so it is important that you act soon to protect your rights under the fund.  Contact us today.

We have identified 54 priests who were accused of sexually abusing children in the Diocese of Harrisburg.  

Through our own investigation, we have identified 54 priests who have been publicly accused of sexual misconduct with children:

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Harrisburg may have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

 

Diocese of Erie logo

Sexually Abused by a priest of the Diocese of Erie? Talk to a lawyer today.

Our law firm is offering free confidential evaluation of clergy sexual abuse claims involving priests of the Diocese of Erie.  We have been handling clergy abuse cases for many years. Contact us today at (954) 641-2100 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to find out if you are eligible for compensation.

The facts are clear: the Diocese of Erie engaged in the coverup of the sexual abuse of children for decades.

The Diocese of Erie has been home to some of the most notorious priests alleged to have committed child sexual abuse. Thanks to a landmark grand jury report, and many brave survivors of clergy abuse in Erie, those facts are now coming to light.

The civil lawsuits that have been filed against the Diocese of Erie and the extensive Grand Jury Report into the practices of the Diocese of Erie have exposed a culture of sexual abuse, cover-up, and efforts by church to protect the reputation of the Diocese of Erie even if it meant putting children in harm’s way.  As a result of the Grand Jury’s findings in the Diocese of Erie, Bishop Lawrence Persico finally released the names of more than 60 clergy and laypeople accused of sexual abuse and other misconduct in the Diocese. Most disturbingly, the grand jury found that the former Diocese of Erie Bishop Alfred M. Watson failed to stop many instances of abuse when they were credibly reported to the Diocese of Erie. Because of the statute of limitations in Pennsylvania, those victims are barred from bringing suit against the Diocese.

The Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report reveals mountains of evidence of sexual abuse of minors committed by dozens of priests in the Diocese of Erie.  This sexual abuse included grooming and fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, or anus.

The Diocese of Erie has established a voluntary compensation fund for survivors of sexual abuse in Erie, but you must act soon.

Anyone sexually abused by a priest, teacher, volunteer, or anyone else affiliated with the Diocese of Erie may now be able to receive financial compensation without undergoing lengthy, protracted litigation in court.

Recently, the Bishop of Erie, Lawrence Persico, announced that the Diocese of Erie has formed a confidential, voluntary compensation settlement fund for victims of sexual abuse by clergy of the Diocese of Erie.  The fund, which is modeled after similar funds in New York, will compensate victims in a shorter, more cursory process than full-blown litigation. Kenneth Feinberg, a well-known and respected arbitrator of the New York claims and other high-profile claim funds like the 9/11 Fund, and his business manager, Camille Biros, will review each claim as a neutral third party and award claimants compensation.  We have extensive experience handling claims in the New York area and are very familiar with the process and expectations of Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros.

There will be a deadline to file your claim with the Diocese of Erie, so it is important that you act today to protect your rights.  Contact us today.

We have identified 57 Catholic priests accused of sexually abusing minors in the Diocese of Erie, along with more than two dozen lay employees and volunteers.
Through our own investigation, we have identified 57 priests publicly accused of sexual misconduct with children in the Diocese of Erie, along with 25 lay employees such as teachers and volunteers.  The following list includes habitual offenders and others who allegedly committed abuse.  In the case of multiple priests listed below, they were alleged to have abused children at multiple parishes and were transferred from assignment to assignment even after the allegations first came to the attention of the Diocese of Erie:

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Erie.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Erie may have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so please do not delay in reaching out to us.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Diocese of Greensburg logo

Sexually abused by a priest in the Diocese of Greensburg (Pennsylvania)? Talk to a lawyer about your options today.

Our law firm is offering free, confidential evaluations of clergy sexual abuse claims involving priests of the Diocese of Greensburg.  We have been handling clergy abuse cases for many years and have the experience you need to seek justice for what happened to you. Contact us today at (954) 641-2100 or send an e-mail to adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to find out your legal options.

The facts are clear: the Diocese of Greensburg engaged in the coverup of the sexual abuse of children for decades.

The Diocese of Greensburg has been home to some of the most notorious priests alleged to have committed child sexual abuse. Thanks to a recent scathing grand jury report, the facts are now coming to light about how the Diocese officials, including its bishops, protected predator priests before the innocent children in its flock.  Victims of abuse by priests in the Diocese of Greensburg may be able to seek justice in a court of law or through a voluntary settlement fund for what occurred.

The Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report reveals mountains of evidence of sexual abuse of minors committed by priests in the Diocese of Greensburg.  This sexual abuse included grooming and fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, or anus. According to the 2018 Grand Jury Report,

“The Grand Jury uncovered evidence of child sexual abuse committed by a number of priests of the Diocese of Greensburg. The forms of abuse discovered included grooming and the fondling of genitals and/or intimate body parts, as well as penetration of the vagina, mouth, and/or anus. The evidence also showed that Diocesan administrators, including bishops, had knowledge of this conduct and regularly permitted priests to continue in ministry after becoming aware that a complaint of child sexual abuse had been made against them.  This conduct enabled the offenders and endangered the welfare of children.

                *  * *

Finally, the Grand Jury received evidence that several Diocesan administrators, including bishops, often dissuaded victims from reporting to law enforcement.  Meanwhile, the Diocese regularly failed to independently investigate allegations of child sexual abuse in order to avoid scandal and possible civil or criminal liability on behalf of the Diocese, accused priests, and Diocesan leadership.  To the extent an investigation was conducted by the Diocese, it was too often deficient or biased and did not result in reporting credible allegations of crimes against children to the proper authorities or otherwise faithfully respond to the abuse which was uncovered.”

The civil lawsuits that have been filed against the Diocese of Greensburg and the extensive Grand Jury Report into the practices of the Diocese of Greensburg have exposed a culture of sexual abuse and cover-up, and efforts by church to protect the reputation of the Diocese of Greensburg even if it meant putting children in harm’s way. The Grand Jury report identified 20 priests accused of sexual misconduct with minors in the Diocese of Greensburg in the last several decades.  Under pressure from the general public and fellow bishops to release the identities of all priests accused of sexually abusing children, the Diocese of Greensburg recently released the names of 23 priests with “credible and substantiated allegations” of sexual abuse.

The Diocese of Greensburg has established a voluntary compensation fund for survivors of sexual abuse in Greensburg, but you must act soon.

Recently, the Bishop of Greensburg, Edward Malesic, announced that the Diocese of Greensburg has formed a confidential, voluntary compensation settlement fund for victims of sexual abuse by clergy of the Diocese of Greensburg.  The fund, which is modeled after similar funds in New York, will compensate victims in a shorter, more cursory process than full-blown litigation. Respected attorney Kenneth Feinberg, who administered the New York claims and other high profile, sensitive claims like the 9/11 Fund, and his business manager, Camille Biros, will review each claim as a neutral third party and award compensation.  We have extensive experience handling claims in the New York area and are very familiar with the process and expectations of Mr. Feinberg and Ms. Biros in the process.

There will be a deadline by which all claims must be filed with the Diocese of Greensburg, so it is important that you act today to protect your rights under the fund.  Contact us today.

We have identified 23 priests publicly accused of sexual misconduct in the Diocese of Greensburg.

Through our own research, we have identified 23 priests assigned to the Diocese of Greensburg who have been accused of or who have admitted to sexual misconduct. The list of priests below includes many habitual re-offenders and other priests who allegedly committed abuse.  In some cases, priests were alleged to have abused kids at multiple parishes:

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Greensburg.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in Pennsylvania, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Greensburg may have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.

Contact us at (954) 641-2100 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.