Tag: Theodore McCarrick

catholic Churc sexual abuse

Symbolic Steps are OK. But Real Reform is Better.

The head of the Washington DC archdiocese has erased his abusive predecessor’s coat of arms from the DC cathedral.

Through one of his public relations staff, Archbishop Wilton Gregory says removing former archbishop Theodore McCarrick’s shield is intended “to help bring healing and peace to survivors of abuse.”

Maybe so. Or maybe it’s being done to make Gregory seem sensitive. Or maybe Gregory wants to distance himself from McCarrick as the release of an investigation into McCarrick seems imminent. Who knows?

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/gregory-orders-mccarricks-coat-of-arms-removed-from-washington-cathedral-33676

(McCarrick, who also worked in New Jersey, was defrocked last year after being found guilty of numerous crimes, including the sexual abuse of minors and adults and improper handling of other abuse reports by other predators.)

Some say steps like this validate victims.

Others say these gestures are really self-serving, because they minimize or whitewash this crisis by removing reminders of horrific scandal that church donors and church-goers would rather forget.

We at Horowitz law have ambivalent feelings here. But moves like this will seem far less cynical and self-serving if, at the same time, church officials take tangible steps that protect others.

Is that too much to ask?

This is a very simple request – that when a pastor or denominational leader does something to supposedly help abused adults FEEL better, he or she ALSO does something that actually makes vulnerable kids BE safer.

“Like what?” you ask.

Like publicly list names, photos, work histories and current whereabouts of every credibly accused child molester who was or is in the pastor’s or denominational leader’s area (whether alive or dead, employed or volunteer, lay or ordained).

Like publicly declare his or her support for reforming the hurtful statute of limitations on child sex crimes.

Like publicly discipline, demote or at least denounce current or former church staff, volunteers or members who hid or ignored abuse or suspicions of abuse.

Like forbid or publicly blast accused predators and their supporters who say or do things that are apt to intimidate victims, witnesses or whistleblowers from speaking up (like attacking their motives or timing or holding rallies for the accused).

This is just a very short list. The group SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, has made many helpful suggestions to church officials over the years.

So our advice to the hierarchy of every church, school, camp or institution that’s experienced child sex abuse and cover ups is simple: You want to make a symbolic gesture that might help victims? Fine. But at the very same time, take a real step that will, in fact, help kids be safer.

heodore mccarrick sexual abuse

There Are Still More Questions That Need to Be Answered About Ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick

Soon, supposedly, Catholic officials in Rome will release their so-called ‘investigation’ into Theodore McCarrick, a former top US prelate who’s accused of both committing and concealing child sex crimes.

https://cruxnow.com/news-analysis/2020/01/popes-early-2020-likely-to-be-dominated-by-documents-rather-than-deeds/

Here’s a crucial question that ‘investigation’ needs to answer: Who in the church benefitted from the roughly $600,000 in gifts McCarrick gave over 17 years to fellow clerics?

https://wapo.st/2ZZPqOf

And here’s why that matters: That sum of money can effectively silence many who know about or suspect crimes.

(The Washington Post reports that “Several of the more than 100 (church official) recipients were directly involved in assessing misconduct claims against McCarrick.”)

The parishioners and the public (and of course law enforcement) deserve to know who took cash and ignored or hid McCarrick’s crimes.

I predict, however, that the Vatican’s report will narrowly focus just on McCarrick himself. And that’s wrong. McCarrick’s been defrocked. He likely won’t ever be in a position to conceal child sex crimes again.

But most of those church figures who took his money are very likely still in power. And they’re compromised. And unless they’re exposed and punished, they’ll likely conceal child sex crimes again.

Under duress, some Catholic officials have been willing to throw their predecessors under the bus. That’s especially true if the wrongdoer is dead or has already been disciplined.

The true test of transparency is whether current employees, not just former employees, are revealed to have acted improperly.

Real reform is when all wrongdoers – past and present – are ‘outed.’ That’s what Vatican officials should do with the McCarrick case.

McCarrick’s secret fund took in more than $6 million. He wrote more than 200 checks to Catholic officials. We should know who those men are (especially the dozen or so US attorneys general who are investigating church abuse and cover ups).

https://apnews.com/343d656d7f034d58bcc4c0acceada7bc

Abp. Theodore McCarrick – Archdiocese of Newark

Archbishop Theodore McCarrick

Archdiocese of Newark

Theodore McCarrick Archdiocese of Newark Horowitz Law

Ordained: 1958

Removed: 2018

Laicized: 2019

Assigned as follows:

  • 1959-1966      Archdiocese of New York Serving Outside the Diocese Special Assignments, Catholic University (Washington, D.C.) 
  • 1967-1969      Archdiocese of New York Serving Outside the Diocese Special Assignments (Catholic University of Puerto Rico (Ponce) 
  • 1970-1971      Blessed Sacrament (New York, NY) 
  • 1972-1977      Cathedral of St. Patrick (New York, NY)
  • 1978-1980      St. Francis De Sales (New York, NY) 
  • 1978-1981      Auxiliary Bishop Archdiocese of New York 
  • 1981                 The New York Foundling Hospital (New York, NY)  
  • 1982-1986      Bishop of Metuchen
  • 1987-2000      Archbishop of Newark
  • 1989-2000      Sacred Heart Cathedral (Newark, NJ) 
  • 2001-2006      Cardinal Archbishop of Washington
  • 2006-2017      Retired (Washington, D.C.); US Conference of Catholic Bishops
  • 2018-2021      Unknown

Summary of Abuse Allegations against Archbishop Theodore McCarrick:

Archbishop Theodore McCarrick was ordained a priest in 1958 and served in the Archdiocese of Newark. Once considered the most powerful Catholic priest in America, he was the archbishop of Washington DC, archbishop of Newark, bishop of Metuchen, and  auxiliary bishop of New York. He was the priest “Meet the Press” talked to about the sexual abuse crisis. He also participated at the funerals of Ted Kennedy, Beau Biden, Tim Russert and William Rehnquist. He retired from ministry in 2006, after being a priest for 60 years. 

According to media reports, in June 2018, the Archdiocese of New York substantiated allegations that Archbishop McCarrick sexually abused a 16-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New York and Cardinal Cooke’s personal secretary in the 1970s. The Vatican quickly removed him from public ministry. Though he claimed his innocence, in July 2018, he resigned from his position as a cardinal, making him the first cardinal to ever resign over sexual-abuse allegations. 

The pope ordered him to live in seclusion, prayer and penitence. He was transferred to a friary in a remote, small town in Victoria, Kansas. The town, one of the only places that would accept Archbishop McCarrick is near a Catholic school. Parishioners were shocked, but assured by Church officials that no one, including their children would ever see the priest.

It has been reported that some in the church hierarchy had known about accusations brought against Archbishop McCarrick for decades. He had three prior allegations of sexual misconduct made against him in Newark and Metuchen. There were settlements in two of the cases. In July 2018, a man said that Archbishop McCarrick abused him for 20 years, beginning in 1969 when he was age 11. 

The alleged victim was the first baby that the priest baptized. When he brought him to meet Pope John Paul II in 1988, the man said that in the presence of several Vatican officials, he had been sexually abusing him since childhood.

“I told him I had been abused as a child by this man, and I need you to stop it,” he said. “He put both hands on my head, and told me he would pray for me.”

No other action was taken. In October 2018, the Vatican ordered a new investigation. In July 2019, under the Child Victims Act, the man filed a lawsuit.

In January 2019, a third allegation was investigated. Several priests and ex-priests have reportedly come forward alleging Archbishop McCarrick used his authority to force them to sleep with him when they were adult seminarians studying for the priesthood. All four U.S. dioceses where he served, New York, Metuchen, Newark, and Washington, DC, have launched independent investigations.

In January 2019, Archbishop McCarrick was laicized.

In December 2019, a man filed a lawsuit under New Jersey’s new Victim’s Rights Bill alleging that he was sexually abused by Archbishop McCarrick as a teenager in 1995 at a parish in Hackensack.

“The reality is simple,” the man said. “The Catholic Church can do better, should do better, and must do better to protect the children in its care. If it wants to have a future filled with young people, it’s time for eloquence of action and an end to eloquence of words.”

In July 2020, Cardinal McCarrick was named in a lawsuit alleging that he participated with other priests in a sex ring involving children.

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Archdiocese of Newark in New Jersey.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused in the Archdiocese of Newark, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Archdiocese of Newark now have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.  Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of clergy sexual abuse in New Jersey and nationwide. We can help. 

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.

Abp. Theodore McCarrick – Diocese of Metuchen

Archbishop Theodore McCarrick

Diocese of Metuchen

Theodore McCarrick Diocese of Metuchen Horowitz Law

Ordained: 1958

Removed: 2018

Laicized: 2019

Assigned as follows:

  • 1959-1966      Archdiocese of New York Serving Outside the Diocese Special Assignments, Catholic University (Washington, D.C.) 
  • 1967-1969      Archdiocese of New York Serving Outside the Diocese Special Assignments (Catholic University of Puerto Rico (Ponce) 
  • 1970-1971      Blessed Sacrament (New York, NY) 
  • 1972-1977      Cathedral of St. Patrick (New York, NY)
  • 1978-1980      St. Francis De Sales (New York, NY) 
  • 1978-1981      Auxiliary Bishop Archdiocese of New York 
  • 1981                The New York Foundling Hospital (New York, NY)  
  • 1982-1986      Bishop of Metuchen
  • 1987-2000      Archbishop of Newark
  • 1989-2000      Sacred Heart Cathedral (Newark, NJ) 
  • 2001-2006      Cardinal Archbishop of Washington
  • 2006-2017      Retired (Washington, D.C.); US Conference of Catholic Bishop

Summary of Abuse Allegations against Archbishop Theodore McCarrick:

Archbishop Theodore McCarrick was ordained a priest in 1958 and served in the Diocese of MetuchenHe held various leadership positions throughout his career. Once considered the most powerful Catholic priest in America, he was the archbishop of Washington DC, archbishop of Newark, bishop of Metuchen, and  auxiliary bishop of New York. He was the priest “Meet the Press” talked to about the sexual abuse crisis. He also participated at the funerals of Ted Kennedy, Beau Biden, Tim Russert and William Rehnquist. He retired from ministry in 2006, after being a priest for 60 years. 

According to media reports, in June 2018, the Archdiocese of New York substantiated allegations that Archbishop McCarrick sexually abused a 16-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New York and Cardinal Cooke’s personal secretary in the 1970s. The Vatican quickly removed him from public ministry. Though he claimed his innocence, in July 2018, he resigned from his position as a cardinal, making him the first cardinal to ever resign over sexual-abuse allegations. 

The pope ordered him to live in seclusion, prayer and penitence. He was transferred to a friary in a remote, small town in Victoria, Kansas. The town, one of the only places that would accept Archbishop McCarrick is near a Catholic school. Parishioners were shocked, but assured by Church officials that no one, including their children would ever see the priest.

It has been reported that some in the church hierarchy had known about accusations brought against Archbishop McCarrick for decades. He had three prior allegations of sexual misconduct made against him in Newark and Metuchen. There were settlements in two of the cases. In July 2018, a man said that Archbishop McCarrick abused him for 20 years, beginning in 1969 when he was age 11. 

The alleged victim was the first baby that the priest baptized. When he brought him to meet Pope John Paul II in 1988, the man said that in the presence of several Vatican officials, he had been sexually abusing him since childhood.

“I told him I had been abused as a child by this man, and I need you to stop it,” he said. “He put both hands on my head, and told me he would pray for me.”

No other action was taken. In October 2018, the Vatican ordered a new investigation. In July 2019, under the Child Victims Act, the man filed a lawsuit.

In January 2019, a third allegation was investigated. Several priests and ex-priests have reportedly come forward alleging Archbishop McCarrick used his authority to force them to sleep with him when they were adult seminarians studying for the priesthood. All four U.S. dioceses where he served, New York, Metuchen, Newark, and Washington, DC, have launched independent investigations.

In January 2019, Archbishop McCarrick was laicized. 

Horowitz Law is a law firm representing victims and survivors of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and other clergy in the Diocese of Metuchen in New Jersey.  If you need a lawyer because you were sexually abused by a priest in New Jersey, contact our office today. Although many years have passed, those abused by Catholic clergy in the Diocese of Metuchen now have legal options, but filing deadlines will apply so do not delay in reaching out to us.  Our lawyers have decades of experience representing survivors of clergy sexual abuse in New Jersey and nationwide. We can help.

Contact us at (888) 283-9922 or adam@adamhorowitzlaw.com to discuss your options today.